sociologygirl

turkeyinacan:

diggingaditch:

turkeyinacan:

shoutout to people working weekends and overnights and overtime, people working in hospitality and retail and food service, who are sacrificing time with their loved ones, so fuckers with weekday desk jobs get to live comfortably with the amenities we provide while simultaneously shitting all over us for not getting “real jobs”

This literally does not happen

You literally have no concept of the grown-up world.

blackmagicalgirlmisandry

gradientlair:

The Violence That Black Trans Women Face

[content warning: transmisogynoir] Tiffany Edwards, 28 years old, is a Black trans woman who was shot to death in Ohio. Cemia “Ci Ci” Dove, 20 years old, is Black trans woman who was stabbed to death and her body was further brutalized in Ohio. Mia Henderson, 26 years old, is a Black trans woman who was killed and her body experienced “severe trauma” in Maryland. Brittany-Nicole Kidd-Stergis, 22 years old, is a Black trans woman who was shot to death in Ohio.

They are just a (recent) sampling of the young Black trans women who face astronomical rates (such that most homicides among LGBTQ people are of trans women of colour, particularly Black trans women) of violence and homicide because of anti-Blackness, racism, sexism, misogyny, misogynoir, colourism, classism/economic violence, for some, misogynoir specific to sex work, and transmisogyny in general. There are so many intersecting oppressions and one that is regularly eclipsed when violence on Black trans women is discussed is anti-Blackness itself, which alludes to the ways in which the socially acceptable hatred and oppression of Black women in general amplifies for Black trans women. Even in death, as anti-Blackness never allows death to be the final act for Black people, these women are misgendered and immediately associated with crime, versus their gender and humanity honored and their lives respected. Blackness alone, let alone their other intersecting oppressions guarantees that the latter is unlikely.

Whenever street harassment, domestic violence, sexual assault, police harassment, police brutality, extrajudicial violence/execution and State violence are discussed, Black trans women’s experiences have to be included. Whether the violence is intraracial (re: what Laverne Cox explained about this, not as arbitrary Black pathology but inherently occurring because of the impact of anti-Blackness, White supremacy and more on gender for Black people), interracial (as some violence occurs to Black trans women just for existing, as with CeCe McDonald, while some is related to transmisogynoir and sex work), extrajudicial or State violence (such as the consistent willful violence from the police as in what Monica Jones experienced, healthcare and legal systems), Black trans women’s experiences have to be included. (And there’s much to be said about the impact of oppression on Black trans women and mental health since almost 50% Black trans people, in general, have attempted suicide.)

Information on violence against Black trans women and structural factors that contribute to this (some includes other LGBTQIA populations):

Devastating to regularly encounter these stories. This is also violence on Black people. Tiffany’s, Cemia’s, Mia’s and Brittany’s lives mattered. Black trans women matter.

blackmagicalgirlmisandry
orbshaped:

walterspizza:

i made a thing so i can send it to people who keep insisting israel is not committing genocide against palestine 
with that it is bedtime i am too depressed for this shitty ass world

interesting thing abt this convention did u know that the us and canada fought for the “systematic destruction of language and culture” or something along those lines to be dropped from the original definition so what the american and canadian governments were and are doing to indigenous peoples wouldnt be considered genocide lol

orbshaped:

walterspizza:

i made a thing so i can send it to people who keep insisting israel is not committing genocide against palestine 

with that it is bedtime i am too depressed for this shitty ass world

interesting thing abt this convention did u know that the us and canada fought for the “systematic destruction of language and culture” or something along those lines to be dropped from the original definition so what the american and canadian governments were and are doing to indigenous peoples wouldnt be considered genocide lol

blackmagicalgirlmisandry
Under capitalism, if you are not part of the profit machine, if money can’t be made from you, you are not entitled to resources or care and are thrown on the scrap heap. Under capitalism, people with disabilities must fight the system to get basic rights such as food, shelter, housing, community and dignity — so freely given as part of the system in Indigenous cultures.

Disability Rights in the Age of Austerity

in critiquing “civilization” and capitalism, this article romanticizes “(pre-1492) Indigenous cultures” and falsely assumes they’re all the same. with that said, some of the general historical points about “disability” being a rather a rather modern stigma, are true and important. 

(via disabilityhistory)

nezua

Above all, capitalism wastes human life. The U.S. spends billions to warehouse 2 million people—many of them young Black and Latino men—in overcrowded prisons. It provides sub-par education to millions of poor students, sending a message that their lives will amount to nothing.

Are people homeless in America because there’s a shortage of homes? And if that’s the case, is there a shortage of homes because we don’t have the concrete, the wood and the steel to build them?

The truth is that under capitalism, there’s no incentive to build low-cost housing for the homeless—because it isn’t profitable to do so.

The same goes for the more than 800 million people in the world who go hungry. It isn’t profitable to feed them. So food is stockpiled or destroyed rather than distributed to them.

Is the free market efficient? (via afghangst)

That’s the problem with making greed the touchstone of societal morality.

(via nezua)
nezua
Women have always been healers. They were the unlicensed doctors and anatomists of Western history. They were abortionists, nurses, and counselors. They were pharmacists, cultivating healing herbs and exchanging secrets of their uses. They were midwives, travelling from home to home and village to village. For centuries women were doctors without degrees, barred from books and lectures, learning from each other, and passing on experience from neighbor to neighbor and mother to daughter. They were called “wise women” by the people, witches or charlatans by the authorities. Medicine is part of our heritage as women, our history, our birthright.
Witches Midwives and Nurses: A History of Women Healers - Barbara Ehrenreich & Deirdre English (via cielito-lindo)